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Be careful of fake events posted on Facebook – Families losing £90 due to fake event this past weekend

Be careful of fake events posted on Facebook – Families losing £90 due to fake event this past weekend

This isn’t the first fake event we’ve seen on Facebook, a few months ago we saw Project X Freshers Events, Total Wipeout Scam and Open Cinema Club.

11am Sunday 7th August various people turned up to an event called Comic-Con Run, unfortunately, it really was a massive con with tickets (£20.98-£25.28) being worthless when there was no sign of the organisers for the 5K run event.

The event organisers had promised a day ‘all about having fun’ and advised participants to dress up as a ‘dastardly villain’ for the Charity 5K event.

Jo Dulson-Cox and her family had paid a total of £90 via Eventbrite (a legit ticket company) to attend Comic-Con Run, she said:

‘We spent about £90 to come today, the kids all got dressed up ready to go and there’s nothing here, no signs, nothing,’

‘It’s really, really disappointing. We booked a good three months ago, when it was advertised on Facebook and on the Eventbrite website. We’ve reported the event. We’re going to put claims in. I’m hopeful we’ll get our money back but we won’t know until we try.’

The Comic-Con Run Facebook page has been removed (unsure on dates) with their Twitter account not being active since May 2016.

[Pictured above]  Jamie Unwin, 26 who had paid £25 for his ticket and had travelled 60-miles for the day.

How do I avoid a fake event?

Thankfully 99% of events are legit but just do your research and keep checking social media prior to the event. Most events will be posting updates to encourage more people to donate/join etc right up until the day of the event.

If you’re unsure then contact the organisers and if you don’t here back try and contact the location (e.g. the local park / council etc) to confirm the event has been booked.

Ask others on local Facebook groups etc.

Check the company you’ve purchased the tickets from on sites like DueDil or Companies House.

What should I do if I’ve paid for a fake event?

First of all, double check the event is fake, the last thing legit events need is tons of people cancelling at the last minute.

If you’re adamant the event is fake then contact the company, then your card issuer/bank and finally local trading standards.

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